darb.ketyov.com

Caveat lector: This blog is where I try out new ideas. I will often be wrong, but that's the point.

Home | Personal | Entertainment | Professional | Publications | Blog

Search Archive

18.4.11

The 10 most cited neuroscience papers

ResearchBlogging.org
Over on Quora someone asked, "What are the most-cited works in neuroscience?"

As some of you may know, I love literature mining. I started brainSCANr with my wife to look at how neuroscience research is conducted. I've been talking with Neuroskeptic about looking at biases in how different neuroscience topics are studied.

This question on Quora piqued my interest, so I decided to try and work out the answer. I had to do some digging.

(source)


My first thought was of a retrospective published in Nature Reviews Neuroscience last year that revisited ten of its most-cited papers between 2000 and 2010: Ten years of Nature Reviews Neuroscience: insights from the highly cited.

A quick Google search showed that the Journal of Neuroscience also has a list of its most-cited papers on its site.

But in both of these cases we've got a clear bias: they only show the highly-cited articles published within their respective journals. And there are a lot of journals that publish neuroscience research.

Any answer I can find will come with a lot of caveats. It's difficult enough to define which papers are "neuroscience", let alone track down the "top cited" ones in an unbiased manner. From what I've seen, the most-cited papers tend to be methodological or crystallography structures. However, in order to reduce any sub-field bias, I wanted to find a database of papers to work from.

The ISI Web of Knowledge runs a site, ISI Highly Cited, wherein you can search by specific neuroscience researcher, but that information doesn't tell you about specific highly-cited papers. Cool, but no good here.

Thomson Reuters (who owns the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI)) also runs ProCite, which, thankfully, has a nice little site wherein they provide citation counts for 2610 neuroscience papers published in the ten-year period between 1995 and 2005. Those data come in a nicely-formatted text file.

Yay datas!

These types of files are data pornography for me. They make what I do so easy and fun!

(Yeah, I said it. Fun. What?)

(source)


Mind you, the results from ProCite come with caveats: I can't say that they're comprehensive (I don't know how they defined "neuroscience") and they're temporally restricted (1995-2005). Never the less, it's a good start.

Of those 2610 "highly cited" articles, 1877 had more than 100 citations. 1951 of the 2610 articles were classified as "research articles", 656 as "reviews" (and 3 as "notes"?) There were a total of 108 unique journals represented in this sample.

The breakdown by of the 20 journals with the largest number of highly-cited articles looks like this:

Bradley Voytek Neuron PNAS citations

(Why yes, I do have a first-authored paper in three of those top five journals! I hadn't noticed! What? You'd like to give me a job? Why thank you! That would be delightful. ::COUGH::)

As an aside, I'd like to point out that 4 of the top 10 journals have one-word journal titles: Neuron, Nature, Science, and Neurology. Out of the 108 total journals represented, 22 have one-word titles. This means we should only see two--not four--one-word title journals in the top 10. This supports my pet theory that one-word title journals fare better than journals with longer titles. (This is a little ironic, because the journal with the longest title is also in the top 10: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, but they've long since learned to refer to themselves simply as "PNAS".)

Of course, the earlier the year of the paper's publication, the more frequently it's been cited, which suggests that the citation counts for these articles will continue to increase (that is, after 10 years they still haven't really stopped getting cited).

Bradley Voytek citations

Without further ado, here are the 10 most highly-cited neuroscience articles published between 1995 and 2005, ordered by number of citations:

1. (1684 citations) Sherrington et al., Cloning of a gene bearing missense mutations in early-onset familial Alzheimer's disease. Nature 1995.
2. (1603 citations) Polymeropoulos et al., Mutation in the alpha-synuclein gene identified in families with Parkinson's disease. Science 1997.
3. (1513 citations) Caterina et al., The capsaicin receptor: a heat-activated ion channel in the pain pathway. Nature 1997.
4. (1396 citations) Südhof, The synaptic vesicle cycle: a cascade of protein-protein interactions. Nature 1995.
5. (1369 citations) Pin & Duvoisin, The metabotropic glutamate receptors: structure and functions. Neuropharmacology 1995.
6. (1288 citations) Tessier-Lavigne & Goodman, The molecular biology of axon guidance. Science 1996.
7. (1246 citations) McKeith et al., Consensus guidelines for the clinical and pathologic diagnosis of dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB): report of the consortium on DLB international workshop. Neurology 1996.
8. (1186 citations) Games et al., Alzheimer-type neuropathology in transgenic mice overexpressing V717F beta-amyloid precursor protein. Nature 1995.
9. (1065 citations) Hsiao et al., Correlative memory deficits, Abeta elevation, and amyloid plaques in transgenic mice. Science 1996.
10. (1050 citations) Levy-Lahad et al., Candidate gene for the chromosome 1 familial Alzheimer's disease locus. Science 1995.

What's amazing to me is that 7 of the top ten papers are from Nature or Science, and 5 of them are more or less about Alzheimer's disease. This suggests a relative homogeneity of "top" researched topics.

As a final note, it's important to point out that these publications are from 1995-2005. They ignore older papers, as well as more recent ones. Given that the modern scientific publishing era began in 2003 with the founding of PloS and PLoS Biology, there wasn't really any time for papers published in those journals to really have any representation in this dataset.

Luo, L., Rodriguez, E., Jerbi, K., Lachaux, J., Martinerie, J., Corbetta, M., Shulman, G., Piomelli, D., Turrigiano, G., Nelson, S., Joëls, M., de Kloet, E., Holsboer, F., Amodio, D., Frith, C., Block, M., Zecca, L., Hong, J., Dantzer, R., Kelley, K., & (Bud) Craig, A. (2010). Ten years of Nature Reviews Neuroscience: insights from the highly cited Nature Reviews Neuroscience, 11 (10), 718-726 DOI: 10.1038/nrn2912
Sherrington R, Rogaev EI, Liang Y, Rogaeva EA, Levesque G, Ikeda M, Chi H, Lin C, Li G, Holman K, Tsuda T, Mar L, Foncin JF, Bruni AC, Montesi MP, Sorbi S, Rainero I, Pinessi L, Nee L, Chumakov I, Pollen D, Brookes A, Sanseau P, Polinsky RJ, Wasco W, Da Silva HA, Haines JL, Perkicak-Vance MA, Tanzi RE, Roses AD, Fraser PE, Rommens JM, & St George-Hyslop PH (1995). Cloning of a gene bearing missense mutations in early-onset familial Alzheimer's disease. Nature, 375 (6534), 754-60 PMID: 7596406
Polymeropoulos MH, Lavedan C, Leroy E, Ide SE, Dehejia A, Dutra A, Pike B, Root H, Rubenstein J, Boyer R, Stenroos ES, Chandrasekharappa S, Athanassiadou A, Papapetropoulos T, Johnson WG, Lazzarini AM, Duvoisin RC, Di Iorio G, Golbe LI, & Nussbaum RL (1997). Mutation in the alpha-synuclein gene identified in families with Parkinson's disease. Science (New York, N.Y.), 276 (5321), 2045-7 PMID: 9197268
Caterina MJ, Schumacher MA, Tominaga M, Rosen TA, Levine JD, & Julius D (1997). The capsaicin receptor: a heat-activated ion channel in the pain pathway. Nature, 389 (6653), 816-24 PMID: 9349813
Südhof TC (1995). The synaptic vesicle cycle: a cascade of protein-protein interactions. Nature, 375 (6533), 645-53 PMID: 7791897
Pin JP, & Duvoisin R (1995). The metabotropic glutamate receptors: structure and functions. Neuropharmacology, 34 (1), 1-26 PMID: 7623957
Tessier-Lavigne M, & Goodman CS (1996). The molecular biology of axon guidance. Science (New York, N.Y.), 274 (5290), 1123-33 PMID: 8895455
McKeith IG, Galasko D, Kosaka K, Perry EK, Dickson DW, Hansen LA, Salmon DP, Lowe J, Mirra SS, Byrne EJ, Lennox G, Quinn NP, Edwardson JA, Ince PG, Bergeron C, Burns A, Miller BL, Lovestone S, Collerton D, Jansen EN, Ballard C, de Vos RA, Wilcock GK, Jellinger KA, & Perry RH (1996). Consensus guidelines for the clinical and pathologic diagnosis of dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB): report of the consortium on DLB international workshop. Neurology, 47 (5), 1113-24 PMID: 8909416
Games D, Adams D, Alessandrini R, Barbour R, Berthelette P, Blackwell C, Carr T, Clemens J, Donaldson T, & Gillespie F (1995). Alzheimer-type neuropathology in transgenic mice overexpressing V717F beta-amyloid precursor protein. Nature, 373 (6514), 523-7 PMID: 7845465
Hsiao K, Chapman P, Nilsen S, Eckman C, Harigaya Y, Younkin S, Yang F, & Cole G (1996). Correlative memory deficits, Abeta elevation, and amyloid plaques in transgenic mice. Science (New York, N.Y.), 274 (5284), 99-102 PMID: 8810256
Levy-Lahad E, Wasco W, Poorkaj P, Romano DM, Oshima J, Pettingell WH, Yu CE, Jondro PD, Schmidt SD, & Wang K (1995). Candidate gene for the chromosome 1 familial Alzheimer's disease locus. Science (New York, N.Y.), 269 (5226), 973-7 PMID: 7638622

11 comments:

  1. Hmm, that seems weird. I seem to remember that Karl Friston's fMRI methods papers from 1995 have got >1000 cites... let me look

    yes this one http://dx.doi.org/10.1006/nimg.1995.1023 has 1174 according to Google, so ought to be number 9.

    Assuming you accept it as "neuroscience" and not "statistical methods".

    ReplyDelete
  2. Yeah, that's why I included that caveat statement in the middle: "It's difficult enough to define which papers are "neuroscience"... From what I've seen, the most-cited papers tend to be methodological or crystallography structures."

    But for whatever reason, the database of article I got from Thompson-Reuters didn't include that one. When you look at the "top 10", they all look like biology papers. No higher-level systems or cognitive at all.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Some of these top 10 are reviews, the others mostly seem to come from either Mega-Labs or constitute collaborations between various labs (based on the large number of authors). So this would support the argument that large, well-funded labs are the most likely to produce the highest quality science.

    Also, seems like we should all be working on Alzheimer's.

    ReplyDelete
  4. I thought about doing an analysis of the number of authors in the top 10 versus the rest of the papers. You think there'd be more authors on the top-10 papers, on average, due to the mega-collaborations?

    ReplyDelete
  5. Joel Mainland10:59

    If you just go to web of science, type neuroscience in the Topic search, and rank by times cited, then Hollman's "Cloned Glutamate Receptors" review from 1994 tops the list with 2840 citations. LeDoux's "Emotion Circuits in the Brain" review from 2000 comes in second with 2063 citations and was published in the window ProCite was looking at. You can also limit the search to articles (to exclude reviews) and "Thresholding of statistical maps in functional neuroimaging using the false discovery rate" from Neuroimage is at the top with 1,448 citations.

    We can't really compare these counts to the list from the ProCite database, because they are current counts and the ProCite database had to cutoff counting at some time point. Karl Friston’s paper gets 1174 citations in Google scholar and 1006 in web of science, but No. 10 on the Procite list has 1355 citations currently. In other words, the Friston paper doesn’t belong on the top 10 list. Why it isn't in the database at all is more of a mystery.

    In a current search, the Sherrington paper (No. 1 in ProCite database) has 2,211 hits according to this database, and the Polymeropoulos paper (No. 2 in ProCite database) now has 2865. Apparently these aren't under the Neuroscience "Topic" in ISI’s search engine, but ISI’s ProCite database has a broader definition of neuroscience. Or maybe just a different definition—is LeDoux’s review in the ProCite database and just didn’t have enough citations to make the list at their cutoff date, or is it missing entirely?

    ReplyDelete
  6. Joel:

    Thanks! That's great! Seems so simple... I initially went with the ProCite database because it was nicely formatted and I could do some analyses on it. But I didn't think to use Web of Knowledge to sort by citation and then export a bibliography! If I do that I can still do some pretty cool textual analyses.

    Damn... now I need to do a followup post to correct my errors...

    ReplyDelete
  7. Dan H14:14

    I used Scopus to search for:
    (SUBJAREA(neur) OR SUBJAREA(psyc)) AND PUBYEAR AFT 1990
    That's all papers listed in the neuroscience or psycholog subject areas that were published after 1990. For what it's worth, I did this search on 4/22/2011.

    Ajzen, I.
    The theory of planned behavior
    (1991) Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, 50 (2), pp. 179-211. Cited 5905 times.
    Article

    Friston, K.J., et al
    Statistical parametric maps in functional imaging: A general linear approach
    (1994) Human Brain Mapping, 2 (4), pp. 189-210. Cited 4877 times.
    Article

    Cohen, J.
    A power primer
    (1992) Psychological Bulletin, 112 (1), pp. 155-159. Cited 4430 times.
    Article

    Turk, M., Pentland, A.
    Eigenfaces for recognition
    (1991) Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, 3 (1), pp. 71-86. Cited 4289 times.
    Article

    Braak, H., Braak, E.
    Neuropathological stageing of Alzheimer-related changes
    (1991) Acta Neuropathologica, 82 (4), pp. 239-259. Cited 3879 times.
    Review

    Markus, H.R., Kitayama, S.
    Culture and the self: Implications for cognition, emotion, and motivation
    (1991) Psychological Review, 98 (2), pp. 224-253. Cited 3596 times.
    Article

    Varki, A.
    Biological roles of oligosaccharides: All of the theories are correct
    (1993) Glycobiology, 3 (2), pp. 97-130. Cited 3031 times.
    Review

    Prochaska, J.O., DiClemente, C.C., Norcross, J.C.
    In search of how people change: Applications to addictive behaviors
    (1992) American Psychologist, 47 (9), pp. 1102-1114. Cited 3003 times.
    Article

    Bell, A.J., Sejnowski, T.J.
    An information-maximization approach to blind separation and blind deconvolution.
    (1995) Neural computation, 7 (6), pp. 1129-1159. Cited 2768 times.
    Article

    Hollmann, M., Heinemann, S.
    Cloned glutamate receptors
    (1994) Annual Review of Neuroscience, 17, pp. 31-108. Cited 2746 times.
    Review

    McDonald, W.I., et al
    Recommended diagnostic criteria for multiple sclerosis: Guidelines from the International Panel on the Diagnosis of Multiple Sclerosis
    (2001) Annals of Neurology, 50 (1), pp. 121-127. Cited 2659 times.
    Article

    Sheehan, D.V., et al
    The Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview (M.I.N.I.): The development and validation of a structured diagnostic psychiatric interview for DSM-IV and ICD-10
    (1998) Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, 59 (SUPPL. 20), pp. 22-33. Cited 2630 times.
    Conference Paper

    Robinson, T.E., Berridge, K.C.
    The neural basis of drug craving: An incentive-sensitization theory of addiction
    (1993) Brain Research Reviews, 18 (3), pp. 247-291. Cited 2624 times.
    Review

    Podsakoff, P.M., et al
    Common Method Biases in Behavioral Research: A Critical Review of the Literature and Recommended Remedies
    (2003) Journal of Applied Psychology, 88 (5), pp. 879-903. Cited 2562 times.
    Review

    Petersen, R.C., et al
    Mild cognitive impairment: Clinical characterization and outcome
    (1999) Archives of Neurology, 56 (3), pp. 303-308. Cited 2492 times.
    Article

    ReplyDelete
  8. Dan H14:20

    Removing the year cutoff and just searching for neuroscience, the clinical diagnostic scales dominate all with the first Friston SPM paper coming in at #7. It's not that shocking that MMSE is #1.

    Folstein, M.F., Folstein, S.E., McHugh, P.R.
    'Mini mental state'. A practical method for grading the cognitive state of patients for the clinician
    (1975) Journal of Psychiatric Research, 12 (3), pp. 189-198. Cited 26977 times.
    DOCUMENT TYPE: Article

    McKhann, G., Drachman, D., Folstein, M.
    Clinical diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease: Report of the NINCDS-ADRDA work group under the auspices of Department of Health and Human Services Task Force on Alzheimer's disease
    (1984) Neurology, 34 (7), pp. 939-944. Cited 11793 times.
    DOCUMENT TYPE: Article

    HAMILTON, M.
    A rating scale for depression.
    (1960) Journal of neurology, neurosurgery, and psychiatry, 23, pp. 56-62. Cited 9772 times.
    DOCUMENT TYPE: Article

    Oldfield, R.C.
    The assessment and analysis of handedness: The Edinburgh inventory
    (1971) Neuropsychologia, 9 (1), pp. 97-113. Cited 9272 times.
    DOCUMENT TYPE: Article

    Zigmond, A.S., Snaith, R.P.
    The hospital anxiety and depression scale
    (1983) Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica, 67 (6), pp. 361-370. Cited 7810 times.
    DOCUMENT TYPE: Article

    Kay, S.R., Fiszbein, A., Opler, L.A.
    The positive and negative syndrome scale (PANSS) for schizophrenia
    (1987) Schizophrenia Bulletin, 13 (2), pp. 261-276. Cited 4964 times.
    DOCUMENT TYPE: Article

    Friston, K.J., Holmes, A.P., Worsley, K.J., Poline, J.-P., Frith, C.D., Frackowiak, R.S.J.
    Statistical parametric maps in functional imaging: A general linear approach
    (1994) Human Brain Mapping, 2 (4), pp. 189-210. Cited 4877 times.
    DOCUMENT TYPE: Article

    Poser, C.M., Paty, D.W., Scheinberg, L.
    New diagnostic criteria for multiple sclerosis: Guidelines for research protocols
    (1983) Annals of Neurology, 13 (3), pp. 227-231. Cited 4421 times.
    DOCUMENT TYPE: Article

    Kurtzke, J.F.
    Rating neurologic impairment in multiple sclerosis: An expanded disability status scale (EDSS)
    (1983) Neurology, 33 (11), pp. 1444-1452. Cited 4312 times.
    DOCUMENT TYPE: Article

    Turk, M., Pentland, A.
    Eigenfaces for recognition
    (1991) Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, 3 (1), pp. 71-86. Cited 4289 times.
    DOCUMENT TYPE: Article

    ReplyDelete
  9. Anonymous21:04

    A Baddeley Working memory Science, 1992 - sciencemag.org

    Cited by 11993

    beat this!

    ReplyDelete
  10. Dan H07:01

    It looks like you're listing the Google Scholar citation count for the Baddeley Science paper. Those counts are always much much higher than Scopus or PubMed because they count citations in non-peer reviewed conference abstracts or other online documents. It good to see those documents when searching for related works, but it makes for very large & noisy total citation counts.

    For example, the top of my list above:
    Ajzen, I. The theory of planned behavior (1991) Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes now has 6847 citations on scopus compared to 1458 Scopus citations for the 1992 Baddeley paper. On Google scholar, The Aizen paper has 18630 citations compared to 11993 for the Baddeley paper.

    Baddeley 1992 is a major paper with a lot of citations, but it's far from being on a neuroscience-wide top ten list.

    ReplyDelete
  11. Elise Stanley11:17

    You've mixed original papers with reviews! These really should be dealt with separately - the reivewers in essense take credit for the work done by the original scientists.

    Also, IMO papers get cited because a field is controversial, not necessarily because they are right. Thus, the discovery of tetrodotoxin was a pivotal one for neuroscience research but it was accepted so quickly (it was dead right) the original paper never really hit the citation mill....

    ReplyDelete